Monthly Archives: December 2010

Bible Verse of the Day for Friday

As we enter the last day of 2010 and prepare to enter 2011, please take a moment to focus in on the last sentence of today’s Secripture, and try to make it part of your New Year’s Resolution…

“I have learned the secret of facing plenty and hunger, abundance and want.  I can do all things in Him who strengthens me.”

    – Philippians 4:12b-13

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Kindle Reset Instructions

We have a lot of people reading this blog on their Kindle’s, and I am going to set this message up to send out approximately once a month: if you’ve seen it before and know what I’m talking about, or if you’re just plain ‘ole tired of seeing it don’t worry – I’ll be back with a new post soon.

There seems to be a slight Kindle problem for a lot of folks – that is, what do you need to do if (a) this or any other blog all of a sudden stops updating each day on the Kindle, and (b) you can see it in the to be downloaded list of the “Manage Your Kindle” section of the Amazon website.

You will need to write this down, or try to memorize it, because if it happens to you I’m willing to bet you won’t remember unless you’ve reset your Kindle a few times!

If you would like to print this out, click here to read my post on my Free Kindle Books Plus a Few Other Tips  blog on how to capture screen shots on your Kindle.

If this happens to you, you will need to reboot your Kindle.  Here is how you do it:

  1. Click the “Home” button to get back to your home screen.
  2. Click the “Menu” button, and select “Settings.”
  3. You will see several options, but “reboot” is not one of those options.  Press the “Menu” button again.
  4. You will have several options, but choose and click the “Restart” button.

Once you do that, it will take about 1-2 minutes to reboot.  Make sure your wireless is on, and the Kindle will go look in the Amazon store to see what is pending to be downloaded and viola! You should be back in business.  If you ever need to restart your Kindle, I hope this helps!

Want to have this blog sent wirelessly to your Kindle vs. reading it on your computer?  Click Here for the Bible Verse of the Day

Don’t have a Kindle?  Click Here to learn more!

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Books of the New Testament

Books of the New Testament

Four hundred years after the close of the Old Testament, the New Testament completes the cosmic story of God’s plan to bring salvation upon the earth.  The word testament is best translated as “covenant.” The New Testament embodies the new covenant of which Jesus was mediator.  This new covenant was sealed with the atoning death of Jesus Christ.

The New Testament opens with five narrative books – four Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles.  The Gospels cover the ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus.  The Book of Acts continues the story of the development of the early church over the next thirty years.

Matthew

Mark

Luke

John

Acts of the Apostles

Romans

First Corinthians

Second Corinthians

Galatians

Ephesians

Philippians

Colossians

First Thessalonians

Second Thessalonians

First Timothy

Second Timothy

Titus

Philemon

Hebrews

James

First Peter

Second Peter

First John

Second John

Third John

Jude

Revelation

 

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Books of the Old Testament

Books of the Old Testament

The Old Testament begins with God’s creation of the universe and continues by describing the mighty acts of God in and through His people.  The 39 books of the Old Testament were written over a period of several centuries.

The first five books of the Old Testament are referred to as the Books of the Law or the Pentateuch, a Greek word meaning “five volumed.”  The Hebrew term for this collection is Torah, meaning “instruction, teaching, or doctrine.”

Genesis

Exodus

Leviticus

Numbers

Deuteronomy

Joshua

Judges

Ruth

First Samuel

Second Samuel

First Kings

Second Kings

First Chronicles

Second Chronicles

Ezra

Nehemiah

Esther

Job

Psalms

Proverbs

Ecclesiastes

Song of Songs

Isaiah

Jeremiah

Lamentations

Ezekiel

Daniel

Hosea

Joel

Amos

Obadiah

Jonah

Micah

Nahum

Habakkuk

Zephaniah

Haggai

Zechariah

Malachi

 

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A Little Bible History

I’ve posted this before, but we have new members all the time who have not read it so I will be posting this on a quarterly basis.  I will be adding to this over time, so stay tuned.  The following was compiled from Wikipedia and other Internet resources.

 

The Authorized King James Version is an English translation of the Christian Bible begun in 1604 and completed in 1611 by the Church of England.  Printed by the King’s Printer, Robert Barker, the first edition included schedules unique to the Church of England; for example, a lectionary for morning and evening prayer. This was the third such official translation into English; the first having been the Great Bible commissioned by the Church of England in the reign of King Henry VIII, and the second having been the Bishop’s Bible of 1568.  In January 1604, King James I of England convened the Hampton Court Conference where a new English version was conceived in response to the perceived problems of the earlier translations as detected by the Puritans, a faction within the Church of England.

James gave the translators instructions intended to guarantee that the new version would conform to the ecclesiology and reflect the episcopal structure of the Church of England and its beliefs about an ordained clergy. The translation was done by 47 scholars, all of whom were members of the Church of England. In common with most other translations of the period, the New Testament was translated from the Textus Receptus  (Received Text) series of the Greek texts. The Old Testament was translated from the Masoretic Hebrew text, while the Apocrypha were translated from the Greek Septuagint (LXX), except for 2 Esdras, which was translated from the Latin Vulgate.

While the Authorized Version was meant to replace the Bishops’ Bible as the official version for readings in the Church of England, it was apparently (unlike the Great Bible) never specifically “authorized,” although it is commonly known as the Authorized Version in the United Kingdom. However, the King’s Printer issued no further editions of the Bishops’ Bible; so necessarily the Authorized Version supplanted it as the standard lectern Bible in parish church use in England. In the Book of Common Prayer (1662), the text of the Authorized Version replaced the text of the Great Bible — for Epistle and Gospel readings — and as such was “authorized” by Act of Parliament. In the United States, the Authorized Version is known as the King James Version. The earliest appearance in print of the phrase “authorized version”, to mean this particular version of the bible, was published in 1824.  The phrase “King James version” first appeared in print in 1884.

By the first half of the 18th century, the Authorized Version was effectively unchallenged as the English translation used in Anglican and Protestant churches. Over the course of the 18th century, the Authorized Version supplanted the Latin Vulgate as the standard version of scripture for English speaking scholars.

The followers of John Wycliffe undertook the first complete English translations of the Christian scriptures in the 15th century. These translations were banned in 1409 due to their association with the Lollards.  The Wycliffe Bible pre-dated the printing press but was circulated very widely in manuscript form, often inscribed with a date earlier than 1409 to avoid the legal ban. As the text translated in the various versions of the Wycliffe Bible was the Latin Vulgate, and as it contained no heterodox readings, there was in practice no way by which the ecclesiastical authorities could distinguish the banned version; and consequently many Catholic commentators of the 15th and 16th centuries (such as Thomas More) took these manuscript English bibles to represent an anonymous earlier orthodox translation.

William Tyndale translated the New Testament into English in 1525.

In 1525, William Tyndale, an English contemporary of Martin Luther, undertook a translation of the New Testament.  Tyndale’s translation was the first printed Bible in English. Over the next ten years, Tyndale revised his New Testament in the light of rapidly advancing biblical scholarship, and embarked on a translation of the Old Testament.  Despite some controversial translation choices, the merits of Tyndale’s work and prose style made his translation the ultimate basis for all subsequent renditions into Early Modern English.  With these translations lightly edited and adapted by Myles Coverdale, in 1539, Tyndale’s New Testament and his incomplete work on the Old Testament became the basis for the Great Bible. This was the first “authorized version” issued by the Church of England during the reign of King Henry VIII.  When Mary I succeeded to the throne in 1553, she returned the Church of England to the communion of the Roman Catholic faith and many English religious reformers fled the country, some establishing an English-speaking colony at Geneva. Under the leadership of John Calvin, Geneva became the chief international centre of Reformed Protestantism and Latin biblical scholarship.

These English expatriates undertook a translation that became known as the Geneva Bible.   This translation, dated to 1560, was a revision of Tyndale’s Bible and the Great Bible on the basis of the original languages   Soon after Elizabeth I took the throne in 1558, the flaws of both the Great Bible and the Geneva Bible (namely, that the Geneva Bible did not “conform to the ecclesiology and reflect the episcopal structure of the Church of England and its beliefs about an ordained clergy”) became painfully apparent.   In 1568, the Church of England responded with the Bishops’ Bible, a revision of the Great Bible in the light of the Geneva version.  While officially approved, this new version failed to displace the Geneva translation as the most popular English Bible of the age – in part because the full Bible was only printed in lectern editions of prodigious size and at a cost of several pounds.   Accordingly, Elizabethan lay people overwhelmingly read the Bible in the Geneva Version – small editions were available at a relatively low cost. At the same time, there was a substantial clandestine importation of the rival Douay-Rheims New Testament of 1582, undertaken by exiled Roman Catholics. This translation, though still derived from Tyndale, claimed to represent the text of the Latin Vulgate.

 

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Bible Verse of the Day for Saturday

Merry Christmas!

“If I speak in the tongues of mortals and of angels, but do not have love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and I if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give away all my possessions, and if I hand over my body so that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing. Love is patient; love is kind; love is not envious or boastful or arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice in wrongdoing, but rejoices in the truth. It bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.  Love never ends. But as for prophecies, they will come to an end; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will come to an end. For we know only in part, and we prophecy only in part; but when the complete comes, the partial will come to an end.  When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child; when I became an adult, I put an end to childish ways. For now we see in a mirror, dimly, but then we will see face to face. Now I know only in part; then I will know fully, even as I have been fully known. And now faith, hope, and love abide, these
three; and the greatest of these is love.”

– 1 Corinthians 13

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Merry Christmas!

Happy birthday, Jesus, and Merry Christmas to all!

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government will be upon his shoulder, and his name will be called ‘Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.’”

        – Isaiah 9:6-7

 

“And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.”

–          Luke 2:7

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